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Three Nutrition Lies We Tell Ourselves - Rachel Gurevich, our Infertility Expert at About.com suggested I make a list of lies we tell ourselves about eating -- basically how we stretch the truth about certain beneficial foods to justify our over-indulgences, even when we have the best of intentions. Here are three that I can think of: If a little olive oil is good, a lot is better, so you can eat more. Olive oil is good for your heart because it's rich in monounsaturated fatty acids called oleic acids. When you replace some of your saturated fat intake with monounsaturated fats, you're doing your heart a favor. But here's what makes it tricky. First, you need to reduce some of those saturated fats, not just pour the olive oil on top of your regular saturated fat intake (if it's high). Also, all fats are high in calories, coming in at 9 calories per gram, so consuming a lot of olive oil can add too many calorie...
Feed Source: nutrition.about.com

Tiny Tastes -- Helping Picky Eaters - Parents can often help picky eaters by offering small tastes of new foods. The key is to offer the foods over and over and over until your kid gets used to it. It takes at least ten tries before most picky eaters will start to like new foods. I already knew this, but knowing something doesn't always make it easier -- I really didn't have any new ideas for helping parents deal with their picky kids. Then a couple of months ago I found out about Tiny Tastes. Tiny Tastes is a tasting game -- kids try teeny tiny bites of foods they don't normally like and they get stickers when they eat the foods. the pack comes with instructions, a chart and stickers. I think Tiny Tastes can help a lot of parents -- and they also have research evidence using the game -- which is something I also like. Each kit sells for £5.99 (about $10.00), plus shipping....
Feed Source: nutrition.about.com

Obesity - What Was the Tipping Point? - Right now in the US, about one-third of the population is obese. This wasn't the case 30 years ago. Sometime between then and now, we changed the way we eat. So what happened? We know why so many people are obese. Too much food, with lots of calories, over-processed with lots of sugar and unhealthy fats. And lack of physical activity is also takes part of the blame. But why did this happen? What was the tipping point that turned us into a bunch of chubby lemmings ready to plummet off the cliff into an abyss of obesity-related chronic disease? And more important now -- what is the tipping point that will get us back to a healthy weight?Think about a typical day, How many people start the day with sugary cereals, maybe some frozen things that heat up in the toaster? Maybe just grab a cup of coffee or a bottle of Mountain Dew and a ...
Feed Source: nutrition.about.com

I Love Smoothies - I think fruit and protein smoothies are an awesome way to get good nutrition. There are so many varieties of fruit and protein smoothies that you can have a different smoothie every day and not get tired of them. Make a simple smoothie by putting a banana, some berries, a little yogurt and milk in a blender and blend until it's smooth. Or you can dress up your smoothie with exotic fruits like mango, and add a protein boost with protein powder. If you love your chocolate, you can add cocoa powder or use chocolate flavored protein powder. If you've never tried to make your own smoothie, start with a basic recipe and once you have the idea, you can experiment with any fruits, yogurt, protein powders, antioxidant powders and even peanut butter. Here are some ideas and tips for delicious and healthy smoothies that I've found on About.com: Tips for the Per...
Feed Source: nutrition.about.com

Mangos All Year Long - I received a box of fresh mangos from the National Mango Board, along with a few notes on how to use mangos all year long. I like mangos, but I usually just eat them as they are or buy mango juice, so I'm looking forward to trying some of the Mango Board's ideas, especially the Mango, Pineapple And Raspberry Yogurt Snack Cup. There's a recipe for Turkey Burger and Mango Pita Melt there as well, and now I'm wondering how mango would taste with a veggie burger. Anyway, take a look at the Mango Board's lengthy list of ...
Feed Source: nutrition.about.com

Super Seeds - Flax Seeds Flax seeds contain fiber, vitamins, minerals and healthy omega-3 fatty acids, called alpha linolenic acid (ALA). They also have lignans, which are phytochemicals that might help restore hormonal balance. You can buy whole flax seeds, milled flax seeds or just buy the oil (which doesn't have the fiber). The whole flax seeds keep fresh the longest and you can grind a spoonful or two of seeds easily in a coffee grinder. Store flax seeds and flax seed oil in your refrigerator. Chia SeedsChia seeds are put on a lot of superfoods lists because they're high in fiber and, like flax seeds, they contain omega-3 fatty acids. They may help you lose weight or improver your heart health, but we don't know for sure because there isn't enou...
Feed Source: nutrition.about.com

Ten Things That Aren't in My Shopping Cart (and Shouldn't Be in Yours) - I might be sort of weird because I actually like to go grocery shopping. I usually start out with a list and I may stick to it, or I may veer off of it a little bit if something good is on sale, or if there's any interesting seasonal stuff available. It isn't all nutritional perfection; chocolate or other treats might find their way into my cart. Plus, I like to buy some convenience items, like frozen fruits and vegetables or canned chickpeas and black beans, and jars of artichokes. But, there are some foods I just can't handle. Here are ten things you won't find in my shopping cart: Fake Cheese Yeah I lived in Wisconsin for a good number of years and I'll indulge in the real deal, but no fake squirt-it-from-a-can cheese for me. Not only is it mostly unhealthy, it tastes nasty and looks creepy. Give me a bit of 10-year-aged chedder instead. Pork Rinds I mean, this is animal fat that's been deep-fried. It's deep-fried fat, with lots of sodium and probably some weird...
Feed Source: nutrition.about.com

Spring Forward or Fall Back: Foods Can Help You Adapt - The change from to Standard to Daylight Savings Time in the spring and back again n the fall can mess up your sleeping pattern. Your body will adjust, but it helps to pay closer attention to your diet. Here's what I do when the time changes. Go easy on the caffeine. A cup of coffee or two in the morning is fine, but consuming too much caffeine later in the day may disrupt your sleep.Don't skip breakfast. Even if you're groggy in the morning, you need to get some fuel in your body before going to work or school.Avoid heavy foods or spicy foods, especially at night. Or any foods you know that may cause heartburn, making it difficult for you to sleep.Don't drink too much alcohol. Over-consumption of your favorite adult beverages may cause a very restless uncomfortable night.Eat cherries. Not only are they rich in vitamins, cherries contain melatonin, a substance also found in the human body that helps regulate sleep. Eating fresh ...
Feed Source: nutrition.about.com

Eating for January - This is the time when many of us are focusing on cleaning up our diets -- usually to lose weight, but also to feel healthier and more energenic. Good January foods are low in calories but high in nutrients, and if you're in the colder latitudes, you'll probably want some dishes that are nice and warm. It's a great time for soups and stews, with a little whole grain bread on the side (maybe time to bring out that old bread making machine?). But not any old soup will do, be sure to choose soups that are clear broth based and if you're sensitive to sodium, like me, you might want to stay away from most of those canned soups, unless you choose the ones that have reduced the sodium content. It's easy to make your own soup. All you need is some broth, some vegetables and maybe a sprinking of salt, pepper and your favorite seasonings. Put everything in a slow-cooker, maybe add some meat for protein and let the soup simmer until the vegetables are cooked through. Add a salad o...
Feed Source: nutrition.about.com

Holiday Diet Tips - I know that people don't want to think about healthy eating all the time during the holidays. In fact, it's a time of year that gets a little quiet for us nutritionists, but I've decided to give 7 quick tips -- do one each day for a week. I'm hoping if you do just that one thing, and then the next thing the next day and so on, that you'll have a healthier holiday and your New Years resolutions won't be so daunting. Holiday diet tip #1 is share your dessert. Basically, cutting your dessert in half cuts out half the fat, sugar and calories and hopefully minimizes the health damage it does. Holiday diet tip #2 is to eat something at home before you go shopping. If you're hungry and you have a full day of shopping ahead of you, you might fall prey to the fast foods at the mall food court or on the ride back home. Take the time to eat a healthy meal or snack before you go. Or take something healthful, like some ...
Feed Source: nutrition.about.com

Short-term, high-fat diet accelerates disuse atrophy and protein degradation in a muscle-specific manner in mice - Background: A short-term high-fat diet impairs mitochondrial function and the ability of skeletal muscle to respond to growth stimuli, but it is unknown whether such a diet alters the ability to respond to atrophy signals. The purpose of this study was to determine whether rapid weigh gain induced by a high-fat (HF) diet accelerates denervation-induced muscle atrophy. Methods: Adult, male mice (C57BL/6) were fed a control or HF (60 % calories as fat) diet for 3 weeks (3wHF). Sciatic nerve was sectioned unilaterally for the final 5 or 14 days of the diet. Soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were removed and incubated in vitro to determine rates of protein degradation and subsequently homogenized for determination of protein levels of LC3, ubiquitination, myosin heavy chain (MHC) distribution, and mitochondrial subunits. Results: When mice were fed the 3wHF diet, whole-body fat mass more than doubled, but basal (innervated) muscle weights, rates of protein degradation, LC3...
Feed Source: www.nutritionandmetabolism.com

Low-calcium diet prevents fructose-induced hyperinsulinemia and ameliorates the response to glucose load in rats - Background: Consuming a fructose-rich diet leads to hyperinsulinemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance. In humans, the consumption of high levels of refined sugars often coincides with a diet containing suboptimal levels of calcium. Calcium and carbohydrate metabolism interact, so there is potential for fructose to have different health outcomes depending on whether the diet is calcium-rich or calcium-poor. Methods: We evaluated the metabolic effects of feeding fructose to rats that were maintained on either a calcium-replete diet or a low-calcium diet. Growing male Sprague Dawley rats were fed diets based on the AIN-93G formulation, with the main source of carbohydrate derived either from a mixture of cornstarch and sucrose or from fructose. Half the rats given each carbohydrate source were fed calcium at recommended levels (125 mmol/kg Ca 2+ ); the others were fed a diet low in calcium (25 mmol/kg Ca 2+ ...
Feed Source: www.nutritionandmetabolism.com

Weight loss-induced changes in adipose tissue proteins associated with fatty acid and glucose metabolism correlate with adaptations in energy expenditure - Background: Energy restriction causes adaptations in energy expenditure (total-,TEE; resting-,REE; activity induced-,AEE).ObjectiveTo determine if changes in the levels of proteins involved in adipocyte glucose and fatty acid metabolism as indicators for energy deficiency are related to adaptations in energy expenditure during weight loss. Methods: Forty-eight healthy subjects (18 men, 30 women), mean?±?SD age 42?±?8 y and BMI 31.4?±?2.8 kg/m 2 , followed a very low energy diet for 8 wk. Protein levels of fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), fructose-bisphosphate aldolase C (AldoC) and short chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HADHsc) (adipose tissue biopsy, western blot), TEE (doubly labeled water), REE (ventilated hood), and AEE were assessed before and after the 8-wk diet. Results: There was a positive correlation between the decrease in AldoC and the decrease in TEE (R?=?0.438, P?...
Feed Source: www.nutritionandmetabolism.com

A randomized controlled trial: the effect of inulin on weight management and ectopic fat in subjects with prediabetes - Background: Fat infiltration of the liver, muscle and pancreas is associated with insulin resistance and risk of diabetes. Weight loss reduces ectopic fat deposition and risk of diabetes, but is difficult to sustain to due to compensatory increases in appetite. Fermentable carbohydrates have been shown to decrease appetite and food intake, and promote weight loss in overweight subjects. In animal studies, fermentable carbohydrate reduces ectopic fat independent of weight loss. We aimed to investigate the effect of the fermentable carbohydrate inulin on weight maintenance, appetite and ectopic fat in subjects with prediabetes. Methods: Forty-four subjects with prediabetes were randomized to 18 weeks? inulin or cellulose supplementation. During weeks 1?9 (weight loss phase) all subjects had four visits with a dietitian to guide them towards a 5 % weight loss. During weeks 10?18 (weight maintenance phase) subjects continued taking their assigned supplementation and were asked to maintain ...
Feed Source: www.nutritionandmetabolism.com

Hepatic S1P deficiency lowers plasma cholesterol levels in apoB-containing lipoproteins when LDLR function is compromised - Background: Site-1 protease (S1P) is the key enzyme required for activation of the sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) that govern lipid synthesis. While S1P has been speculated to influence plasma apoB-containing lipoprotein (Blp) metabolism, there has been little investigative work. LDL receptor (LDLR) is the major receptor for clearing plasma LDL cholesterol (LDL-c). Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) modulates LDL-c through post-translational degradation of the LDLR. Methods: A hepatic-specific knockdown (KD) of S1P was achieved using floxed S1P mouse models (S1P f/f and LDLR -/- S1P f/f ) and hepatic expression of Cre recombinase. Lipids were measured in total plasma and size fractionated plasma using colorimetric assays. Realtime polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and ELISA were used to determine hepatic expression...
Feed Source: www.nutritionandmetabolism.com

Moderate calorie restriction to achieve normal weight reverses β-cell dysfunction in diet-induced obese mice: involvement of autophagy - Background: Severe calorie restriction (CR) is shown to improve or even reverse ?-cell dysfunction in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, whether mild to moderate CR can reverse ?-cell dysfunction induced by obesity and the underlying mechanism remain unclear. Autophagy plays an important role in maintaining mass, architecture and function of ?-cells. While the impact of CR on ?-cell autophagy is unknown. This study aims to investigate the effects of moderate CR on ?-cell function and autophagy activity in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. Methods: DIO C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 3 weeks of switching to normal chow (HF???NC group) or normal chow with 40 % CR (HF???NC CR group). Then hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemistry staining were performed to observe ?-cell morphology. ?-cell function was evaluated by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test in vivo and static GSIS (glucose-stimulated insulin secretion) in isolated islets. ?-cell autophagy activity was d...
Feed Source: www.nutritionandmetabolism.com

Quercetin reduces obesity-induced hepatosteatosis by enhancing mitochondrial oxidative metabolism via heme oxygenase-1 - Background: Obesity-induced hepatic lipid accumulation causes lipotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance, and is implicated in non-alcoholic hepatic pathologies such as steatohepatitis and fibrosis. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an important antioxidant enzyme catalyzing the rate-limiting step in heme degradation, protects against oxidative stress, inflammation, and metabolic dysregulation. Here, we demonstrate that the phytochemical, quercetin, a natural polyphenol flavonoid, protects against hepatic steatosis in obese mice fed a high-fat diet, and that it does so by inducing HO-1 and stimulating increased hepatic mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice were fed a regular diet (RD), a high-fat diet (HFD), and an HFD supplemented with quercetin for 9 weeks. Levels of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolic transcripts/proteins were measured by real-time PCR and/or Western blotting. HO-1 transcripts/proteins were measured...
Feed Source: www.nutritionandmetabolism.com

Does vitamin-D intake during resistance training improve the skeletal muscle hypertrophic and strength response in young and elderly men? – a randomized controlled trial - IntroductionRecent studies have shown that vitamin-D intake can improve skeletal muscle function and strength in frail vitamin-D insufficient individuals. We investigated whether vitamin-D intake can improve the muscular response to resistance training in healthy young and elderly individuals, respectively. Methods: Healthy untrained young (n?=?20, age 20?30) and elderly (n?=?20, age 60?75) men were randomized to 16 weeks of daily supplementary intake of either 48 ?g of vitamin-D?+?800 mg calcium (Vitamin-D-group) or 800 mg calcium (Placebo-group) during a period and at a latitude of low sunlight (December-April, 56°N). During the last 12 weeks of the supplementation the subjects underwent progressive resistance training of the quadriceps muscle. Muscle hypertrophy, measured as changes in cross sectional area (CSA), and isometric strength of the quadriceps were determined. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for fiber type morphology changes and mRNA expression of vitamin-D receptor (VDR), c...
Feed Source: www.nutritionandmetabolism.com

Dietary restriction in obese children and its relation with eating behavior, fibroblast growth factor 21 and leptin: a prospective clinical intervention study - Background: Obesity is significant problem involving eating behavior and peripheral metabolic conditions. The effect of carbohydrate and fat restriction on appetite regulation, fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and leptin in children has not been defined. Our objective was to compare the effect of both diets. Methods: One hundred and twenty children with body mass index (BMI) higher than the equivalent of 30 kg/m 2 for an adult, as corrected for gender and age were randomly assigned to (n?=?60) a low-carbohydrate (L-CHO) diet or (n?=?60) a low-fat (L-F) diet for 2 months. Fifty-three (88.3 %) subjects on the low-carbohydrate-diet and 45 (75 %) on the low-fat diet completed the study. Anthropometric measures, leptin and FGF21 levels were measured before and after the intervention. Comparison of the data for both of the diet groups was carried out using the t-test for independent variables. Intragroup comparisons before and after of each of the...
Feed Source: www.nutritionandmetabolism.com

High-fructose and high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance enhances atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits - Background: Individuals with insulin resistance and resulting impaired glucose tolerance along with type 2 diabetes showed an increased prevalence of atherosclerosis. Our aim in this study was to address whether diet-induced insulin resistance plays any roles in the development of aortic and coronary atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic rabbits. Methods: We fed Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits with a high-fructose and high-fat diet (HFFD) with restricted normal calories and compared the lesions of both aortic and coronary atherosclerosis with those of control WHHL rabbits fed a normal chow diet. Results: HFFD-fed WHHL rabbits showed insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance accompanied by elevated plasma lipid levels and accumulation of adipose tissue even though their body weight was unchanged compared to the control rabbits. At 8 weeks, the aortic gross lesion area of HFFD-fed WHHL rabbits was increased by 40 % over the controls and their lesions were characteriz...
Feed Source: www.nutritionandmetabolism.com

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